"creative borrowing": relax, it's not a caravaggio

Imagine this...you (call yourself @Esteyban) create a meme inspired by something profound your friend said and slap your handle in the middle of it. You appropriately credit your friend for the idea, because you’re an upstanding guy. Someone (@livesosa) comes across your meme on social media. He’s inspired! So he covers your handle - your signature - with his own and distributes it across his social networks as if he made it. But surprise! The meme contains a blatant math error that makes grade 2 teachers cringe. It goes viral, redistributed by other non-mathletes and many others that simply find amusement in other people's mistakes.

If you were on Facebook, or Instagram, or Twitter in the last ten days, you know this really happened. "Creative borrowing" happens all the time, but does that make it ok? In this instance, even the New Yorker's Brian Feldman seemed to dismiss the actual "stealing". Afterall, @Esteyban was cool with it, right? It's purely conjecture, but I think @Esteyban is probably a pretty decent kind of guy who isn't the type to first to cry foul. However, @livesosa is a musician and an adult. Shouldn't he know appropriating someone else's work is stealing? It's not ok. Instead of attracting all kinds of publicity to his brand, someone should be calling him out. 

But maybe I'm wrong. At least one other artist seems to think so...

I'd love to hear what you think...

Laurie DolhanComment